Insights

CW Program Readiness Assessment

The thought of enhancing or implementing your contingent workforce program can be overwhelming. You understand the importance of reducing costs, streamlining processes, increasing the ability to attract quality candidates, and improving compliance… but where do you begin with evaluating your readiness for this level of change?

Look no further! Monument Consulting has you covered. The contingent workforce experts at Monument have developed a readiness assessment to help you decide if now is the right time for a fresh perspective of your program. Monument’s proven “Readiness Assessment” will give your organization the ability to ascertain what your current state of readiness for change is, identify where there are opportunities to improve your program, and provide recommendations on how to achieve your program goals.

The Importance of Assessing for Readiness during Pre-Implementation

Understanding your organization’s current state of readiness for a meaningful transformation is the first step to making a change. To avoid the risk of never getting the change off the ground, you should clearly define the “why” behind your desire to change. Then, work internally to verify that you have the available resources, brainpower, business expertise, and understanding of how viable the longevity of a solution will be. Identifying any weaknesses up front is key to ensuring these obstacles are addressed before they interfere with implementation. Since our company’s inception in 2003, Monument Consulting has helped clients with contingent workforce program enhancements of all shapes and sizes. By utilizing our industry expertise, we will help you evaluate your readiness and identify any potential pitfalls that could prevent you from reaching your goals.

Analyze Your Capacity for Change

Understanding your “why” for change is critical, but do you have the capacity for change? Evaluating your organization’s capacity for change is a crucial step in any transformation. Analyze your organization’s infrastructure, finances, and leadership. This will determine if your capacity for change is sufficient, or it will reveal some areas in need of attention. Once you have your project goals and objectives clearly defined, ask your executives the following questions:

  • Do we have the infrastructure to ensure this change goes smoothly?
  • Do we have support for this change from the necessary stakeholders at all levels?
  • Do we have the resources necessary to implement this change, or do we need to hire new staff members?
  • Do our employees have the skills they need to help execute this change or do they need more education and support?
  • How will our leaders encourage employee buy-in for this project?
  • Can we sustain this change long-term?
  • What is our budgetary allowance for the up-front costs involved in implementing this change?
  • What is our budgetary allowance for the long-term costs involved in sustaining this change’s success?
  • What will the return on investment be for this change?
  • After this change is successfully implemented, will it be scalable?

This analysis will leave you with a clear view of your capacity for change, as well as factors that may need more attention prior to embarking on the initiative. As part of Monument’s Readiness Assessment, we will assist with developing an actionable list for your capacity for change considerations – i.e., identify resource gaps; design a business plan to promote stakeholder buy-in; evaluate technology options from a budget and capability perspective.

Determine What Type of Change is Needed

Once your organization determines a well-defined goal, it’s important to understand what options you have available to achieve that goal. Can the issue be solved with a process change? Does a new technology need to be introduced? Can a system integration solve your problem? Multiple paths can often get you to the same desired result, but these solutions can have a variety of different effort and cost levels associated to them. As part of the Readiness Assessment, the solutions experts at Monument Consulting can help you evaluate your current state and make recommendations on the various options you have to help you reach your desired contingent workforce program results.

What to Do if You’re Ready for Change: Partner with Monument Consulting

Founded in 2003, Monument Consulting is built on a commitment to our clients and our shared values. Through our genuine passion for delivery, relentless pursuit of perfection, and bold decision-making, we are creating a more agile contingent workforce so businesses can dream bigger and achieve more. Our expertise is proven, and we’ve worked with a suite of Fortune 500 companies to help implement innovation that lasts. Our agile model allows us to pick the best tool(s) based on the flows and features that will truly meet our client’s needs and bring them the best outcomes.

If you’re looking for a partner who’s ready to help, contact us.

Insights

Successful SAP Contingent Workforce Management

We’re living in the midst of a workforce revolution. The 20th Century paradigm of seas of cubicles, desktops, and landlines has been replaced by a more agile workforce, remote yet connected, independent yet committed to business success. According to Deloitte, in 2018, nearly 40% of workers were in “alternative work arrangements”, those that don’t quite fit our image of the traditional 9 to 5. Today, it’s inching toward 50%. Some of these are employees working flexible schedules and locations. Others are non-employees just as important to your success. These include freelancers, temps, outside service providers, consultants and more.

They aren’t your employees and, in many cases, you’ve never met them in person. If we’re honest, that does come with its share of management, workflow, and logistical issues. But they’ve become integral within large organizations for a reason. A well-managed contingent workforce is an asset to large companies who need that agility to pivot with changing market and industry landscapes. That’s where SAP contingent workforce management comes in.

What is SAP Contingent Workforce Management?

SAP contingent workforce management is a set of Systems Applications and Products that streamline management of all areas of your non-employee workforce to get the most value from these alternative working partnerships. Also known as Vendor Management Systems (VMS), this set of technologies and surrounding workflows can eliminate much of the stress and hassles around managing non-employees.

These tools help you effectively find and connect with outside services and individuals you need to efficiently and flexibly run a big corporation. Once connected, they give you access to user-friendly tools and analytics to effectively manage this workforce from centralized, integrative, uniform, and intuitive dashboards.

They automate tedious and repetitive management tasks, so you can stay focused on maximizing the value achieved through your non-employee labor. Furthermore, they provide you with usable business intelligence to optimize everything.

This fully-integrative software works with you throughout the entire non-employee work cycle:

  • Hiring, screening, recruiting, and selecting top talent
  • Negotiating and finalizing work arrangements
  • Onboarding, tracking, and payment
  • Offboarding, evaluations, and analytics

What Are the Benefits of SAP Contingent Workforce Management?

The benefits are many. Here are a few you’re sure to notice and appreciate.

Choosing the Right People

SAP can help you connect with the right people for your project faster. Contingent workers aren’t looking for long-term employment. They like the flexibility and autonomy found in not being your employee. With that said, it takes a certain kind of person to “manage” themselves, as a non-employee must do to classify as a contractor. They need not only the skills for the job but the right mind-set — dependability, self-motivation, critical thinking, effective communication, among other skills.

As a bonus, you can gain access to hard-to-source skills more easily.

Cost-savings and Resource Management

They support cost-effective management that saves money through efficiency, not underpaying contingent labor. Thanks to useful analytics capabilities, you’ll achieve greater visibility of contingent workforce spend.

Through it, you can identify redundancies and disjointed management processes that may be costing you money. These tools manage the negotiations for you, reducing that isolated overspending that happens when each hiring manager gets to set the pay rate.

Quality Work and Productivity

Find and onboard new non-employee workers faster through streamlined recruiting and selection processes. As a result, you spend less time training. You have more time generating value for your company from non-employee arrangements. In areas where contingent labor turn-over is naturally higher, this one efficiency can completely change a project’s trajectory.

But at the same time, SAP management can help you retain non-employees because it delivers a better candidate and employee experience. When you create systems and processes that work, it shows you value the people working within those systems. They want to stay with you longer.

Ensure Compliance

Whether you have to abide by HIPAA, SOC, FERPA, or ISO, handing off protected customer data or proprietary information to someone outside your organization is a scary proposition. SAP can put safeguards, best practices, and systems in place to maintain compliance with local and state laws, regulatory bodies, internal compliance standards, and the IRS.

Better Security

In line with compliance, security features allow you to track who’s in the system and what they’re doing. You’ll never have to wonder if a non-employee had access to something they shouldn’t have.

Easy to Use

Technology and processes shouldn’t be complicated. When they are, people create workarounds and you end up with an unproductive mess. SAP workforce management tools are intuitive and easy to learn. They work like people expect them to function, in line with other quality technology solutions. On top of that, they come complete with tons of time-savers like pre-designed reports and templates you can steal to develop your own streamlined processes.

Global Expansion Capabilities

Finally, the highly configurable and integrating nature of these solutions also makes them very scalable, supporting your global expansion initiatives.

What Sets Our SAP Contingent Workforce Management Solutions Apart

As your continent workforce consultant, we can help you implement, train, and integrate SAP into other Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) tools to optimize communication, productivity, security, compliance, and efficiency of this management system.

We work in two primary capacities to meet your large business’ needs, as either a Consultant or Managed Services Provider.

As a consultant, you retain full control over the management of your non-employees as we provide our expertise regarding implementation, training, and getting the most out of SAP solutions and contingent labor arrangements. We can guide you through security, compliance, cost-savings, and all-important correct worker classification.

As an MSP, we offer you full-service implementation, training, and day-to-day maintenance of non-employee workflow. We alleviate the burden of non-employee management while keeping you in the loop with regular analytics, showing you the effectiveness of your streamlined technology and systems.

Are you looking for a better way to manage non-employee resources and think our SAP solutions might be a good option for you? We help Fortune 1000 companies streamline and maximize non-employee labor. Contact us today to discuss Monument Consulting’s SAP management technologies and services.

 

Insights

What is a Vendor Management System (VMS)?

Vendor Management Systems (VMS) are increasingly popular in the contingent workforce space. The right VMS can allow your business to cut costs, more quickly source qualified personnel, plan for total workforce management needs and adjust to increases and decreases in production and demand. Has your company considered exploring the implementation of a VMS? If so, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, the contingent workforce management experts at Monument Consulting cover everything you need to know about VMS solutions.

 

Common Capabilities and Value Adds

An effective VMS, or “Vendor Management System,” is a cloud-based technology solution best known for its ability to streamline the management of contingent workforce. Vendor Management Systems can give companies a leg up by providing a one stop shop for visibility into their full contingent workforce, streamlining processes, increasing compliance, and offering advanced reporting and invoice automation capabilities.

Vendor Management Systems introduce automation to your contingent workforce process, which in return, allows in-house human resources, procurement, and PMO departments to focus on more strategic responsibilities without interruption. Handling external workforce management can be complex, but a VMS can help simplify the process by automating common tasks related to areas such as job posting distribution, vendor management, approvals, candidate qualification, onboarding/offboarding, reporting/analytics, timekeeping, and invoicing.

In addition to automation, a VMS can add value from an audit and compliance perspective. A VMS centralizes your contingent workforce information within a single system, creating accessible audit trails to help ensure you’re meeting all compliance requirements.  Additionally, a VMS can ensure full compliance in regards to legislative and company policies by driving consistency in the process.

With today’s challenging  labor market, finding external talent quickly is crucial for your organization.  Vendor Management Systems can help shorten the time it takes time to fill openings. Hiring managers and vendors will be reminded through the VMS when they have a next step in the hiring process and you will have access to VMS reports that can help you better diagnose which vendors are the most successful in reaching your time to fill KPI’s.

Lastly, a VMS will help control costs by ensuring you are getting contingent labor at a fair price. Rate ranges by role title, location, and experience can be set within the VMS so that you can present your best offer for each opening. Vendors will be subjected to submitting candidates at or below the max rate, helping you to have more controls and better insights on your contingent labor costs.

 

The Benefit of Pairing a VMS with an MSP

The source-to-pay capabilities of a VMS can help your company manage the lifecycle of your contingent workforce. Bringing in a managed services provider (MSP) for complete and daily oversight of the VMS simplifies and enhances processes even further. At Monument Consulting we provide full MSP services with a focus on overall program management, strategic guidance on vendor strategy, enhanced reporting and analytics capabilities of the VMS, and streamlining of the invoice process.

 

 

Notable VMS Companies in the Industry and their Differentiators

  • SAP Fieldglass: SAP Fieldglass was named a leader in the 2021 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Procure-to-Pay Suites. SAP’s VMS solution offers process automation compliance technology, including a single-entry point for all of your locations and business units to avoid any inaccurate or disjointed results; complete supplier partner integration; analytics capabilities; and automated on-boarding processes. They pride themselves on transparency, their ability to work with third parties, and the ability of their various resources to save their corporate partners’ money, particularly on recruiting and training costs.
  • Beeline: Beeline’s Extended Workforce Platform (EWP) is focused on providing a solution for workforce agility. They fill staffing needs for corporate clients who are high volume with shift-based workforces. Beeline’s EWP seeks to leverage clients’ brand equity to recruit talent, looking always to find the best prices. They claim decades of VMS success, and growing rates of automation for seamless tracking of all non-employee personnel.
  • VNDLY: VNDLY represents its VMS platform as “modern, intuitive, and friendly.” It touts agile software with frequent new releases, built-in API integrations, and “effortless” migration from legacy platforms. This might be a good fit for a corporation that is concerned with keeping existing data while modernizing its platforms. VNDLY wants implementation and launch to be as easy as possible for its clients, and strives to provide an intuitive and configurable interface. In December of 2021, it was announced that Workday had officially acquired VNDLY in a move that will undoubtedly have impacts on the industry for years to come.
  • Coupa CCW: Coupa’s goal is to help companies spend less on services, and gain visibility and control during the process. Their VMS aims to provide advanced capabilities to help their corporate clients source and manage workers at scale. They provide onboarding services, processes to reduce compliance risk and improve performance and overall value within your contingent workforce. Among their VMS platforms most important capabilities are staff augmentation optimization, worker tracking acceleration, onboarding compliance automation, and reporting customization.
  • 3Story: 3Story supports an extended end-to-end workflow (from procurement through offboarding). The 3Story VMS allows you to track, automate, and process contingent labor with capabilities that can be catered to your organization. 3Story includes a reporting suit that, amongst other areas, allow you to track costs and performance.

Where the VMS Industry is Headed

As with all industries, we’re prepared to see the VMS space incorporate even more machine-learning capabilities and expansions into features incorporating artificial intelligence technology. Integrated solutions are on the rise, as are compatibility with clients’ HR and procurement departments. Additionally, there’s an increasing focus on the candidate/worker experience ensuring it is easy and intuitive to work with a company through their VMS platform.  One thing is for sure: for long term agility and scalability, the effectiveness of partnering with a contingent workforce management provider is here to stay.

Partnering with Monument Consulting

Founded in 2003, Monument Consulting is built on a commitment to our clients and our shared values. Through our genuine passion for delivery, relentless pursuit of perfection, and bold decision making, we are creating a more agile contingent workforce so businesses can dream bigger and achieve more. Our model is vendor neutral, and we partner with industry-leading VMS systems to bring our corporate clients the best outcomes. If you’re looking for a partner who’s ready to help, contact us.

Press Release

Delta Air Lines’ Keith Browning, managing director, supply chain management, had his eye on the post-pandemic recovery when he decided to evaluate his extended workforce program.

His mission was to make Delta an industry-leading airline while identifying policy and process inefficiencies that might hinder its ability to grow as travel picks back up. Therefore, Browning sought an independent advisor that knew the ins and outs of managing non-employee programs. Enter Monument Consulting, which delivers contingent workforce solutions that can be customized and tailored to meet clients’ concerns.

Browning discusses Delta’s experience and what his program gained from the assessment.

What was the scope of Monument Consulting’s work with Delta?

In March 2021, we engaged Monument Consulting to assess our non-employee workforce — and the contingent workforce program overall — with a focus on stakeholder feedback, our policies and procedures, the effectiveness of the technology we are currently using, and the overall program for improvement opportunities.
We wanted to use Monument’s data to identify gaps in our current program to enable us to become what we consider best-in-class in the marketplace.

For example, we were looking to improve our timelines associated with our direct-hire processes. Monument provided us with benchmarking data to assist in our analysis of our direct-hire processes and associated timelines to understand if our methodologies were on par with the market. It took about six weeks.

It aligned with our goal to streamline the use and engagement of contingent labor and prepare ourselves for growth. Coming out of the pandemic, travel will pick back up and hopefully exceed where we were in the past. Conducting this assessment helped us understand our resource needs as demand for travel comes back and our operations grow.

Given the increase in travel that you expect, what are your plans around your contingent workforce program to meet this need? What’s going to be different?

Obviously, our goal is to make sure we have enough resources to meet the demand of our operations. We are focused on making it easier for our hiring managers to get the talent they need in a very challenging market.

One of the changes we plan to make will include updating the tenure policy so that we do not have to go out to market to replace a resource that already has experience at Delta and knows our culture.

Were Delta’s executive leaders aware and supportive of the project? Who sponsored it?

Yes, our executive leaders in our talent acquisition, supply chain management, IT and internal audit departments were aware of and fully supportive of this project.

The project was sponsored by our chief HR officer and chief people officer; it was championed by the supply chain management and HR/talent acquisition leaders.

What was the exec team thinking before assessment and after?

One of the issues related to the program was lack of visibility — I would say that our senior leaders had minimal, if any, visibility into the program and the day-to-day operations.

In my opinion, our executives view the program as very tactical, but our goal is to have a more strategic focus by developing a comprehensive approach for all resources — including employees and contractors. Monument’s recommendations of developing a communication plan and implementing a governance structure will help us achieve that.

What was unique about the service you received from Monument?

One of the things that stood out was their willingness to collaborate with our current MSP provider and identify opportunities for improvement. It was great to see both companies, who are competitors, work very closely together and be open and honest in their discussions, with minimal resistance offered when exchanging information.

I would say their openness and transparency separate them from not only companies in the industry, but companies that I work with overall. I was impressed by their willingness to truly dig deep and understand our needs, and their willingness to be an independent evaluator of our program. Rather than potentially selling us their business model, they truly were a consultant and a trusted advisor for us.

How did Delta benefit from the assessment conducted by Monument?

For starters, Monument conducted the assessment and delivered on the scope of work within the prescribed timeline — six weeks.

Monument provided a summary of items that needed to be addressed. Some of these issues we were already aware of, but Monument created a comprehensive list of items and recommendations. Now, it is up to us to prioritize and implement.

As mentioned previously, some of the recommendations included implementing a structured governance model by creating a committee of key stakeholders, end users and service provider partners. This will enable escalations of issues and program controls. It will also help us gain alignment on the strategic roadmap for the program.

They also recommended that we develop a concise and defined change management approach to ensure all stakeholders understand any changes to policies or processes.

What are Delta’s short and long-term plans for its CW program?

Short-term, our goals are to implement the governance structure and a communication plan. We also plan to implement some policy changes related to tenure to reflect the current environment and challenges associated with finding and keeping talent. We also plan to develop a process to keep policy and process documents updated and current.

Our long-term goal is to become a best-in-class contingent labor program that is part of the overall approach for human capital at Delta. We plan to look at our technology requirements and implement a VMS that will accommodate our future needs. We also plan to implement strategies to improve diversity for both candidates and suppliers within the program.

Monument Consulting: Re-Imaging the Non-Employee Workforce

At Monument Consulting, we understand the importance of managing your contingent workforce in the most optimized and efficient manner. Therefore, our team uses the industry’s leading vendor management systems to streamline our managed service provider programs. Additionally, we offer contingent and non-employee workforce management consulting services to share our expertise with your staff on how to operate your contingent workforce at maximum efficiency.

To learn how Monument Consulting can assist or advise your program, contact Maritza Morris, director of business development, at [email protected].

Press Release

Delta Air Lines’ Keith Browning, managing director, supply chain management, had his eye on the post-pandemic recovery when he decided to evaluate his extended workforce program.

His mission was to make Delta an industry-leading airline while identifying policy and process inefficiencies that might hinder its ability to grow as travel picks back up. Therefore, Browning sought an independent advisor that knew the ins and outs of managing non-employee programs. Enter Monument Consulting, which delivers contingent workforce solutions that can be customized and tailored to meet clients’ concerns.

Browning discusses Delta’s experience and what his program gained from the assessment.

What was the scope of Monument Consulting’s work with Delta?

In March 2021, we engaged Monument Consulting to assess our non-employee workforce — and the contingent workforce program overall — with a focus on stakeholder feedback, our policies and procedures, the effectiveness of the technology we are currently using, and the overall program for improvement opportunities.
We wanted to use Monument’s data to identify gaps in our current program to enable us to become what we consider best-in-class in the marketplace.

For example, we were looking to improve our timelines associated with our direct-hire processes. Monument provided us with benchmarking data to assist in our analysis of our direct-hire processes and associated timelines to understand if our methodologies were on par with the market. It took about six weeks.

It aligned with our goal to streamline the use and engagement of contingent labor and prepare ourselves for growth. Coming out of the pandemic, travel will pick back up and hopefully exceed where we were in the past. Conducting this assessment helped us understand our resource needs as demand for travel comes back and our operations grow.

Given the increase in travel that you expect, what are your plans around your contingent workforce program to meet this need? What’s going to be different?

Obviously, our goal is to make sure we have enough resources to meet the demand of our operations. We are focused on making it easier for our hiring managers to get the talent they need in a very challenging market.

One of the changes we plan to make will include updating the tenure policy so that we do not have to go out to market to replace a resource that already has experience at Delta and knows our culture.

Were Delta’s executive leaders aware and supportive of the project? Who sponsored it?

Yes, our executive leaders in our talent acquisition, supply chain management, IT and internal audit departments were aware of and fully supportive of this project.

The project was sponsored by our chief HR officer and chief people officer; it was championed by the supply chain management and HR/talent acquisition leaders.

What was the exec team thinking before assessment and after?

One of the issues related to the program was lack of visibility — I would say that our senior leaders had minimal, if any, visibility into the program and the day-to-day operations.

In my opinion, our executives view the program as very tactical, but our goal is to have a more strategic focus by developing a comprehensive approach for all resources — including employees and contractors. Monument’s recommendations of developing a communication plan and implementing a governance structure will help us achieve that.

What was unique about the service you received from Monument?

One of the things that stood out was their willingness to collaborate with our current MSP provider and identify opportunities for improvement. It was great to see both companies, who are competitors, work very closely together and be open and honest in their discussions, with minimal resistance offered when exchanging information.

I would say their openness and transparency separate them from not only companies in the industry, but companies that I work with overall. I was impressed by their willingness to truly dig deep and understand our needs, and their willingness to be an independent evaluator of our program. Rather than potentially selling us their business model, they truly were a consultant and a trusted advisor for us.

How did Delta benefit from the assessment conducted by Monument?

For starters, Monument conducted the assessment and delivered on the scope of work within the prescribed timeline — six weeks.

Monument provided a summary of items that needed to be addressed. Some of these issues we were already aware of, but Monument created a comprehensive list of items and recommendations. Now, it is up to us to prioritize and implement.

As mentioned previously, some of the recommendations included implementing a structured governance model by creating a committee of key stakeholders, end users and service provider partners. This will enable escalations of issues and program controls. It will also help us gain alignment on the strategic roadmap for the program.

They also recommended that we develop a concise and defined change management approach to ensure all stakeholders understand any changes to policies or processes.

What are Delta’s short and long-term plans for its CW program?

Short-term, our goals are to implement the governance structure and a communication plan. We also plan to implement some policy changes related to tenure to reflect the current environment and challenges associated with finding and keeping talent. We also plan to develop a process to keep policy and process documents updated and current.

Our long-term goal is to become a best-in-class contingent labor program that is part of the overall approach for human capital at Delta. We plan to look at our technology requirements and implement a VMS that will accommodate our future needs. We also plan to implement strategies to improve diversity for both candidates and suppliers within the program.

Monument Consulting: Re-Imaging the Non-Employee Workforce

At Monument Consulting, we understand the importance of managing your contingent workforce in the most optimized and efficient manner. Therefore, our team uses the industry’s leading vendor management systems to streamline our managed service provider programs. Additionally, we offer contingent and non-employee workforce management consulting services to share our expertise with your staff on how to operate your contingent workforce at maximum efficiency.

To learn how Monument Consulting can assist or advise your program, contact Maritza Morris, director of business development, at [email protected].

Insights

Building diversity and inclusion within your contingent workforce is imperative. We explore how to focus on strengthening your DE&I goals and strategies!

I live in the world of contract (temporary) labor, or what our fancy industry has deemed “contingent labor.”  One topic that continues to resonate and is at top of mind (and should always be), is that of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DE&I). This is a critical topic if businesses and humanity want to succeed and is one that is near and dear to my heart. Over the years, I have concluded there are several ways to address this challenge within a contract labor program, and I am here to lay out a few of those options and present some of my thoughts on how we should be approaching this problem and address it moving forward. Below, I express my take on building diversity and inclusion in your contingent workforce.

A caveat for this piece, I am by no means an expert, just an inquisitive business leader who likes to ask questions and provoke thought.

Diversity and Inclusion: Addressing the Issue at Hand

First and foremost, for years companies have addressed this problem by working with diversity certified staffing firms (e.g. minority or woman -sometimes Veteran- owned businesses or MBE/WBE). Others chose to partner with a diversity certified MSP who manages all contingent labor spend for the end client.  This results in 100% of a company’s spend qualifying as diverse (but not always if you choose to “follow the dollar” and see where the economic benefit ultimately lands).

Both strategies are admirable and I believe the right intentions exist (as they do support Diverse businesses); however, is there a more effective way to make progress and really “move the needle,” invoke change, and ensure a truly diverse and inclusive talent pool?  Isn’t that what we are truly after?

Isn’t our goal to Change the World, not Check a Box? 

 

A New Approach to DE&I

My view is a bit different, instead of focusing on the spend flowing through your overall contract labor program (which is the strategy mentioned above), why not focus our time and effort on the makeup of the contractor population itself.  The actual diversity (or lack thereof) of the workers in your contingent labor program.

How do we make sure that population more closely resembles and reflects the demographics of your primary business locations, or that of our population in general? Now this can be considered a “risky” proposition by some and there are legal considerations to be aware of, so understanding what policies/strategies can be deployed from your legal teams and MSP partners will be of utmost importance.

So, what options do we have?

  • Do we create SLA’s specific to the diversity of the talent population that the suppliers must hit?
  • Do we set a “submission goal” based upon a certain percentage of diverse candidates being presented for each role?
  • What if a subset of your organization, say an engineering team already has a significantly diverse population of workers, should the goal for that subset be to identify non-diverse candidates?

Keep in mind, many of the thoughts above require candidate visibility and an “opt in” policy.  During an application process candidates cannot be forced to disclose, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc. AND if information is collected, it must not be used during the selection process (nor be available to those involved in the selection process), but rather used for reporting after the candidate(s) are selected.

While the reporting is after selection, the data can be very useful to “tweak” the recruitment and marketing strategies to alter the talent pool and achieve a more diverse population.  Additionally, it is important to train those involved in the selection process to recognize bias and microaggressions that can make individuals feel not included (or even sometimes wanted) in an organization.

 

Your Contract Worker Population and The Need for Evaluation

One thing is for certain and should be implemented, and that is to consistently evaluate the current composition of your contract worker population. A current state view of the demographics within your contract worker population is an absolute must to establish a baseline and seek to improve where weaknesses are identified and ensure your workforce is reflective of the entirety of the population from where it’s garnered.  This may even be an opportunity for staffing companies working within formalized contingent workforce programs to utilize metrics, such as the 2020 US census as benchmarks for diversity within their own regions/communities.

At many organizations, direct employees (FTEs) get their first opportunity at employment via a temporary position. If we are highlighting and focusing on diversity in our contract labor programs and making sure it is important to us, we can then realize progress and impact the diversity of the direct worker population at a particular company.  If (and when) these contract workers are converted as direct workers, the focus then turns to the client’s DE&I goals and strategies, such as retention, promotions into leadership roles, DE&I scorecards, and nonobvious measures that can be leading indicators of DE&I success at a corporation.

 

Benefits of Monument Consulting’s DE&I Council

Beyond being the right thing to do, what can a business expect as a result of this focus? What’s the return? We all intellectually understand that strong diversity of thought within an organization is a key component to sustainable success as a business. One of the first places to look for that diversity of thought remains the composition of your workforce, including the contractor population.

Some of the benefits the Monument DE&I council has highlighted are as follows:

  • Diverse ways of thinking/different perspectives to bring to the table.
  • Diverse experiences that bring additional insights.
  • Employee/contractor satisfaction (having people around you that you can relate to in some way).
  • A greater pool of qualified candidates (if you are selecting from only one demographic, you could be missing out on the perfect fit for your company).
  • Positive company culture: when people have good experiences with a company (or bad) they share them with their personal and professional networks. This can be made up of old colleagues, friends, family, students at universities. The better their word of mouth, the better reflection on that company (or client) within their network.

 

Starting with An Internal Reflection

So, I return to the title of this article and ask, are we checking a box, or changing the world? Although I have zero qualms with clients employing the strategy of driving all spend through a diversity MSP, or diversity certified staffing supplier (as this can be a part of a broader DE&I strategy), I am not convinced this approach accomplishes our goals by leading to a more diverse, inclusive and equitable worker population.

Instead, I will continue to advocate by focusing on the individual contract workers and their composition as the primary motivation and the way to truly impact individuals and make the world a better place to live, work and thrive.

 

Managing Your Inclusive and Diverse Workforce with Monument

At Monument Consulting, we understand the importance of managing your contingent workforce in the most optimized and efficient manner, all while conforming to the DE&I standards. Therefore, our team uses vendor management systems to streamline our managed service provider services.

Additionally, we offer contingent workforce management consulting services to share our expertise with your staff on how to operate your contingent workforce at maximum efficiency. Our team at Monument will train your team how to operate with a VMS and help with your configuration evaluation, system integrations, and system enhancements to tailor the program to your industry and on-demand talent needs.

Are you looking to connect with Monument Consulting? Contact us today to ask about our contingent workforce consulting or managed service provider (MSP) services!

 

Author: Ryan Baker

Contributions by the Monument DE&I Council

Press Release

Delta Air Lines’ Keith Browning, managing director, supply chain management, had his eye on the post-pandemic recovery when he decided to evaluate his extended workforce program.

His mission was to make Delta an industry-leading airline while identifying policy and process inefficiencies that might hinder its ability to grow as travel picks back up. Therefore, Browning sought an independent advisor that knew the ins and outs of managing non-employee programs. Enter Monument Consulting, which delivers contingent workforce solutions that can be customized and tailored to meet clients’ concerns.

Browning discusses Delta’s experience and what his program gained from the assessment.

What was the scope of Monument Consulting’s work with Delta?

In March 2021, we engaged Monument Consulting to assess our non-employee workforce — and the contingent workforce program overall — with a focus on stakeholder feedback, our policies and procedures, the effectiveness of the technology we are currently using, and the overall program for improvement opportunities.
We wanted to use Monument’s data to identify gaps in our current program to enable us to become what we consider best-in-class in the marketplace.

For example, we were looking to improve our timelines associated with our direct-hire processes. Monument provided us with benchmarking data to assist in our analysis of our direct-hire processes and associated timelines to understand if our methodologies were on par with the market. It took about six weeks.

It aligned with our goal to streamline the use and engagement of contingent labor and prepare ourselves for growth. Coming out of the pandemic, travel will pick back up and hopefully exceed where we were in the past. Conducting this assessment helped us understand our resource needs as demand for travel comes back and our operations grow.

Given the increase in travel that you expect, what are your plans around your contingent workforce program to meet this need? What’s going to be different?

Obviously, our goal is to make sure we have enough resources to meet the demand of our operations. We are focused on making it easier for our hiring managers to get the talent they need in a very challenging market.

One of the changes we plan to make will include updating the tenure policy so that we do not have to go out to market to replace a resource that already has experience at Delta and knows our culture.

Were Delta’s executive leaders aware and supportive of the project? Who sponsored it?

Yes, our executive leaders in our talent acquisition, supply chain management, IT and internal audit departments were aware of and fully supportive of this project.

The project was sponsored by our chief HR officer and chief people officer; it was championed by the supply chain management and HR/talent acquisition leaders.

What was the exec team thinking before assessment and after?

One of the issues related to the program was lack of visibility — I would say that our senior leaders had minimal, if any, visibility into the program and the day-to-day operations.

In my opinion, our executives view the program as very tactical, but our goal is to have a more strategic focus by developing a comprehensive approach for all resources — including employees and contractors. Monument’s recommendations of developing a communication plan and implementing a governance structure will help us achieve that.

What was unique about the service you received from Monument?

One of the things that stood out was their willingness to collaborate with our current MSP provider and identify opportunities for improvement. It was great to see both companies, who are competitors, work very closely together and be open and honest in their discussions, with minimal resistance offered when exchanging information.

I would say their openness and transparency separate them from not only companies in the industry, but companies that I work with overall. I was impressed by their willingness to truly dig deep and understand our needs, and their willingness to be an independent evaluator of our program. Rather than potentially selling us their business model, they truly were a consultant and a trusted advisor for us.

How did Delta benefit from the assessment conducted by Monument?

For starters, Monument conducted the assessment and delivered on the scope of work within the prescribed timeline — six weeks.

Monument provided a summary of items that needed to be addressed. Some of these issues we were already aware of, but Monument created a comprehensive list of items and recommendations. Now, it is up to us to prioritize and implement.

As mentioned previously, some of the recommendations included implementing a structured governance model by creating a committee of key stakeholders, end users and service provider partners. This will enable escalations of issues and program controls. It will also help us gain alignment on the strategic roadmap for the program.

They also recommended that we develop a concise and defined change management approach to ensure all stakeholders understand any changes to policies or processes.

What are Delta’s short and long-term plans for its CW program?

Short-term, our goals are to implement the governance structure and a communication plan. We also plan to implement some policy changes related to tenure to reflect the current environment and challenges associated with finding and keeping talent. We also plan to develop a process to keep policy and process documents updated and current.

Our long-term goal is to become a best-in-class contingent labor program that is part of the overall approach for human capital at Delta. We plan to look at our technology requirements and implement a VMS that will accommodate our future needs. We also plan to implement strategies to improve diversity for both candidates and suppliers within the program.

Monument Consulting: Re-Imaging the Non-Employee Workforce

At Monument Consulting, we understand the importance of managing your contingent workforce in the most optimized and efficient manner. Therefore, our team uses the industry’s leading vendor management systems to streamline our managed service provider programs. Additionally, we offer contingent and non-employee workforce management consulting services to share our expertise with your staff on how to operate your contingent workforce at maximum efficiency.

To learn how Monument Consulting can assist or advise your program, contact Maritza Morris, director of business development, at [email protected].

Insights

5 Benefits of MSP Programs

Contingent workforce management requires a combination of the right strategy and a logical set of processes that help achieve the company’s overall workforce goals. Without those components, managing multiple vendors and a multitude of contractors can quickly become disorganized. However, with the partnership of a Managed Service Provider (MSP), you receive a comprehensive solution that implements, manages, and supports your entire contingent labor workforce.

Are you contemplating the benefits of MSP programs? We explore five major benefits of partnering with an MSP which includes all-around savings, program visibility, enhanced supplier management, a streamlined process, and compliance assurance/risk protection.

#1. Generating an All-Around Savings

Businesses from every industry strategize how to earn the greatest return on any investment. One of the greatest benefits of MSP programs is their ability to generate all-around savings.

Many businesses contemplate the value of employing full-time employees to run their contingent workforce operations. With the costs of onboarding, training, and sustaining multiple salaries with benefits, the capital involved may not justify the investment.

However, when your business partners with an MSP, you are assigned a dedicated team of contingent workforce management experts who are credentialed to help your company in multiple avenues. Therefore, for the cost of hiring one, two, or several in-house contingent workforce managers, you could generate a higher ROI and pay less for a team of outsourced MSPs.

#2. Boosting Program Visibility

One challenging component of managing contingent workforces is generating a clear viewpoint into enterprise spending, especially when you have a substantial amount of contingent labor. As a result, your business can quickly lose sight of key metrics associated with this significant part of your organization’s workforce.

However, another benefit of partnering with outsourced Managed Service Providers is gaining clarity on all important metrics and data including but not limited to:

Level of spending

The time-to-fulfill requests

Overall placement quality

Program participation

To assist in program visibility, MSPs oftentimes leverage vendor management systems (VMS) to serve as the single system of record for end-to-end program tracking. This significant amount of data can now be turned into meaningful reports that help reveal trends and assist in overall workforce decisions.

#3. Enhancing Supplier Management

In addition to all-around savings and boosting your overall program visibility, an additional benefit of MSP programs is the ability to enhance supplier management. An MSP effectively alleviates the burden of supplier contract management by creating an additional layer of contractual distance between your company and contingent workers.

When partnering with a reputable MSP , your organization gains instant access to a directory of highly qualified contingent workforce service providers without the process of vetting and contracting them. This frees more time for you to strategize on generating growth and stability for the company while also minimizing exposure to rogue supplier agreements.

#4. Creating A Streamlined Process

Not only do MSPs enhance supplier management, but they also facilitate greater agility within your entire organization. They work to build intelligent workflows that minimize inefficiencies when dealing with the wide range of tasks associated with the contingent workforce. These tasks involve vendor management, candidate sourcing, candidate onboarding, time entry/approvals, and program-wide invoicing.

It becomes obvious why 75% of Fortune 500 companies have formal contingent workforce programs. Outsourcing  programs to an MSP will help ensure that businesses attract the right talent, at the right time using best practices developed by industry experts.

#5. Monitoring Compliance Assurance and Risk Protection

Although crucial to the successful operation of both businesses and contingent workforces, some companies fail to monitor their compliance with state and federal classifications and other relevant human capital mandates. As alternative work arrangements become more common across nearly all industries, businesses now face increased risk and liability in areas regarding employment classification, payroll provider compliance, and taxation. Failure to classify properly can result in fines and back taxes.

MSPs benefit businesses with their external expertise on compliance, best practices, and insights on local, regional, and global regulations and best practices. Not only can they support classification efforts, but they also help with taxation management, data privacy initiatives, and vetting continent workers.

Monument Consulting: A Highly Rated MSP

At Monument Consulting, we understand the importance of managing your contingent workforce in the most optimized and efficient manner. Therefore, our team uses the industry’s leading vendor management systems to streamline our managed service provider programs. Additionally, we offer contingent workforce management consulting services to share our expertise with your staff on how to operate your contingent workforce at maximum efficiency.

Are you looking to connect with Monument Consulting? Contact us today to ask about our contingent workforce consulting or managed service provider (MSP) services!

Insights

5 Benefits of MSP Programs

Contingent workforce management requires a combination of the right strategy and a logical set of processes that help achieve the company’s overall workforce goals. Without those components, managing multiple vendors and a multitude of contractors can quickly become disorganized. However, with the partnership of a Managed Service Provider (MSP), you receive a comprehensive solution that implements, manages, and supports your entire contingent labor workforce.

Are you contemplating the benefits of MSP programs? We explore five major benefits of partnering with an MSP which includes all-around savings, program visibility, enhanced supplier management, a streamlined process, and compliance assurance/risk protection.

#1. Prioritize VMS Implementation Project Scoping

When planning for a successful VMS implementation, our first tip is to conduct a complete and thorough project scope. Without a clear goal and focus, your implementation can easily run off course, wasting valuable time (and money) among your project team, as well as losing credibility with the executive team, project charter sponsors and other internal constituents. Therefore, draft a comprehensive and mutually agreed upon project scope with feedback from the extended constituents that clarifies what the team should implement, why, and how. Furthermore, elaborate on goals, business reasons, expected benefits of the implementation, and the overall implementation timeline, all of which impacts the Return on Investment (ROI) and determining the success of an implementation.

Additionally, it is imperative that the project lead or manager assists by managing any stakeholder expectations. This can be accomplished by identifying key goals and requirements the project team will execute and allowing time for any unexpected issues that may impact the overall budget, timeline, or resource allotment. As a result, the project lead or manager can effectively monitor and track VMS implementation activities to properly meet the documented standard.

Throughout the project, regular checkpoints to update the various stakeholders on progress, achievements, and roadblocks are an important component that ensures a continued investment and interest in the implementation. Also, as part of the project scope, it is equally important to define what the change request process looks like to avoid “scope creep.”

#2. Appoint a Project Sponsor

With any implementation project, especially when integrating a VMS system, one of the most valuable yet overlooked roles is project sponsorship. A project sponsor is critical in remedying any issues if the project lead or manager detects that the implementation process is delaying. Without appointing a project sponsor, the project team can lose valuable time, or even reach an impasse, when trying to maneuver any “corporate politics” with project stakeholders in making strategic and timely decisions.

The role of a project sponsor is to dedicate their time to acquire the support from both corporate stakeholders and executives to guarantee the project expectations are being met across all platforms. In the event an issue arises that challenges the project scope regarding allocated resources, budget, and the project’s overall timeline, the project sponsor works to remove any obstacles. As a result, a project sponsor can help create a streamlined process when planning for a successful VMS implementation.

It is important to note that you must get the proper level of Project Sponsor within the company’s hierarchy. Ideally, the individual should be at a high enough level of the organization to impact change and decisions, but also be close enough to have a vested interest in the project’s success.

Additionally, they should also have the proper level of tolerance/appetite for changes and should be a key internal change management agent (not that they will ultimately “own” change management, but rather be a vocal advocate for it to help progress the project.) It’s particularly helpful to have a sponsor who’s adept at and/or possesses key relationships/partnerships throughout the organization as a VMS implementation touches many areas of a company (i.e. HR, Finance, Operations, Legal, IT, Procurement, amongst others.)

#3. Hold an Internal Meeting with the VMS Implementation Team

With your project scope completed and project sponsor appointed, the final tip is to hold an internal meeting with your VMS provider.

While sharing the vision of the project, the goal of the meeting is to:

  • Introduce the internal team to the implementation team
  • Promote collaboration among subject matter experts and assign the responsibilities for each project team member
  • Answer any questions or concerns regarding roles, responsibilities, and the projected time commitment
  • Establish specific expectations and clarify any misunderstandings that can affect project deliverables
  • Reinforce the project scope, timeline and goals
  • Communicate any key milestones and any “gate” criteria and go/no-go dates

Furthermore, this meeting is a great opportunity for your team to ask the following:

  • Are the subject matter experts qualified?
  • Are they aware of the project and its benefits? Are they vested in it?
  • Do they require any additional communication or education concerning the program?
  • Are there other internal competing projects that project team members are assigned to?

At the close of this meeting, your team can confidently begin a successful implementation and introduce a VMS to your enterprise. Although there is always a risk of an unexpected issue to arise, having a project scope, project sponsor, and a project team all working with the same objective will help you overcome any emerging challenges.

 

Choose Monument: A Highly Rated MSP with VMS Implementation Expertise

Have you completed the three tips above and still feel uncertain about your VMS implementation strategy and training? Consider partnering with our team of managed service providers (MSPs) at Monument Consulting to guide you and help implement it on your behalf with the intention of handing it over for you to manage internally.

At Monument Consulting, we understand the importance of managing your contingent workforce in the most optimized and efficient manner. Therefore, our team uses vendor management systems to streamline our managed service provider services. Additionally, we offer contingent workforce management consulting services to share our expertise with your staff on how to operate your contingent workforce at maximum efficiency. Our team at Monument will train your team how to operate with a VMS and help with your configuration evaluation, system integrations, and system enhancements to tailor the program to your industry.

Are you looking to connect with Monument Consulting? Contact us today to ask about our contingent workforce consulting or managed service provider (MSP) services!